Google Glass, O’ Where Art Thou? - Development Company

Google Glass, O’ Where Art Thou?

Earlier this year, The New York Times published a piece on Google Glass that closely resembled an obituary more than anything else. Sure enough, after the hype dust settled, Google announced in late January this year that they are halting Glass sales for the time being.

Some of you high-tech gear heads out there might be familiar with the name Ned Sahin, a Harvard PhD and cognitive neuroscientist. Sahin says the future of his company is in Google Glass, who recently launched a startup dubbed Brain Power. He feels Glass software can help autistic children pick up essential skills to help them better interact with people around them.

His vision: with its HUD, Glass can shoot instructions while kids interact with people around them. The integrated accelerometer can keep a check on how well they respond. This, Sahin feels, would make Glass ideal for tracking autism, which affects one in every 68 children.

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Earlier this year, The New York Times published a piece on Google Glass that closely resembled an obituary more than anything else. Sure enough, after the hype dust settled, Google announced in late January this year that they are halting Glass sales for the time being.

Some of you high-tech gear heads out there might be familiar with the name Ned Sahin, a Harvard PhD and cognitive neuroscientist. Sahin says the future of his company is in Google Glass, who recently launched a startup dubbed Brain Power. He feels Glass software can help autistic children pick up essential skills to help them better interact with people around them.

His vision: with its HUD, Glass can shoot instructions while kids interact with people around them. The integrated accelerometer can keep a check on how well they respond. This, Sahin feels, would make Glass ideal for tracking autism, which affects one in every 68 children.

Like Sahin, many other companies believe Glass can really power up the industrial and medical sectors, among others. Despite making the January announcement, Google is peddling their device to such companies by the numbers, and even hiring additional staff to transform Google from just a consumer gadget to more of an industry-focused “serious business” type of product.

Sahin’s start up is all set to start a Glass clinical trial at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He has also visited Google quite a number of times to discuss what the future holds for his company and many others like him. Sahin says Google is helping him make the company future-proof and he sees an uber-bright future ahead as far as Glass applications are concerned.

Despite Google’s announcement this year, they have said their Glass at Work program will continue to grow, which has actually seen expansion in the form of five to now ten developer partners, dating back to only October 2014. The general intent is to deliver Glass applications to hospitals and businesses within the country and likely beyond borders.

Here to Stay or Not?

Google-Glass

When we look at it from a consumer standpoint, yes, Glass is now a thing of the past, but not permanently. Late January saw the company shutting down its Glass Explorer program. However, as pointed out by Times, Google plans to shift Glass out of the Google X research lab. It’s going to be overseen by Tony Fadell, the man responsible for the Nest smart thermostat. Under his close supervision, a brand new version of the eyewear is planned.

Google Glass vice president Ivy Ross says that the move to halt Glass sales simply reiterates Google’s stance on the wearables category in general, and that Google is busy building the future of the product.

One thing we can learn from all this press coverage is that Glass is still quite a long ways away from the finish line as far as consumer market success is concerned – many questions have been raised regarding aesthetics, privacy and public perception. These questions however, don’t have much significance when it comes to the business and medicine sector. This is where it is expected to succeed marginally, as was predicted when the device first arrived in the market.

Transitional Phase

Heading Google X, Astro Teller was overseeing Google Glass development and when it finally arrived in 2013, he found himself, well, not wearing it much. Since he wears prescription lenses, he was finding it difficult to wear Glass over them. In fact, he called it downright frustrating.

Google got to work to develop a Glass version which snaps onto your prescription spectacles, and now Teller has no issues wearing Glass over them. Take-home lesson: when Google Glass became available to consumers, it was an unfinished product even though it continues to evolve.

Google admits they jumped the gun on its device’s release, which is interesting since the company had aimed to portray it as a wear-all-the-time device.

Current State of Affairs

Sahin, and many others like him are undeterred by the device’s public perception. It has the potential to be a highly useful tool for treating autism. Others currently engaged in the Glass at Work program see a very bright outlook as far as nation-wide hospitals are concerned – surgeons can greatly benefit from its hands-free capabilities to access online images, data and cameras while they focus on other tasks.

Companies like Meta and Epson are starting to offer computerized headsets that may entertain similar non-consumer markets. It appears they have managed to penetrate the American business. Furthermore, their press isn’t quite as negative as Glass. But then again, the way Sahin sees it, they haven’t quite reached the maturity level Glass has.

Talk to our developers to explore the wonderful possibilities Google Glass brings.

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